Welcome.

Angela Brookes trained at the Central School of Art and London University and taught for some years before becoming a full time printmaker.

An elected member of the co-operative groups ‘Greenwich Printmakers’ and ‘Southbank Printmakers’, and a member of the newly formed group ‘Printmakers-inc’,  she works from her own studio, and in the newly opened Thames Barrier Print Studio on the south bank of the Thames.

Her work has been exhibited at at ‘Bite’ the new national printmaking show, the Royal West of England Academy, The National Theatre, the.gallery@Oxo, Liberty’s, Heal’s, the Mall Galleries, the Biscuit Factory Gallery in Newcastle, Greenwich Printmakers, Southbank Printmakers, Stark Gallery, Grapevine Gallery, the Aldeburgh Gallery, the Purple Gallery and the Junction Gallery.  She also exhibits each year at the London Affordable Art Fairs in Battersea and in Hampstead.

 

Printmaking

Angela work explores the mystery of the landscape.

“The subtle, or sudden movement from light to dark is a constant theme.   The winter snow provides the contrast in light that I love, reversing all the usual tonal values of the landscape.   I have enjoyed depicting the vast and rare snowy vistas of Norfolk, just as much as exploring  the light effects just before dark falls.   I am fascinated by mood, atmosphere,  and light and I seek to capture those moments glimpsed at sunrise and sunset, where sun, mist , wind and light combine to create extraordinary moments of beauty, those moments  which catch my breath.”

Her favoured printmaking process is etching, using soft ground, aquatint and spit-bite.   She often uses two plates to achieve the desired colour, and some are hand coloured.  She also works with dry-point plates in conjunction with carborundum.   Here the editions are very small, between 5 and 20, and she likes to vary the wiping on the plates which makes each print unique, hence ‘edition variable’, and ‘unique print’.

“I find the process of printmaking endlessly fascinating.   I enjoy exploring different processes to create prints, some traditional and some more experimental and contemporary. I often combine dry point and carborundum to create the deep blacks where the ink and paper become one.  Currently I am working with colour using dry point and mono-print to create individual  prints.”

 

 

Ceramics

Her ceramics are thrown or hand built vessels, which are then smoked using a variety of different techniques.    This process satisfies a fascination with all three elements of pottery, earth water and fire, as the smoking process actively involves working with the fire.    Her ceramics are concerned with smooth flowing forms and surface qualities.    The size of the forms governs whether they are thrown or coiled, and sometimes these techniques are used in combination.   The few decorative techniques she employs are resists, using slip and wax.   The varied smoked surfaces are obtained in reduction and oxidising atmospheres sometimes using saggars.   She uses both red and white clays, which are mixed with a heavily grogged clay to resist thermal shock.

Please get in touch if you have any questions.